I work with available light to capture the character and emotional context of my clients work. My skills-developed over a twenty-five year career-allows me to share the experience of my clients work by capturing the subtle nuance of color and texture, form and flow that is the hallmark of sophisticated interior design.

I’ve always felt the best way to capture the character and emotional context of the my clients work is by using available light. HDR technology allows me to work with and manipulate the available light almost as effectively as a painter or rendering artist. I qualify that statement because I must work with what light is actually there, painters have no such restriction.

Here is one example of a very challenging available light image. The only light source used to illuminate the space were the two fixtures visible next to the mirror.

From a technical standpoint the representation of the space is as genuine as can be, there are no glaring hot spots or odd shadows. We have a wealth of texture and detail in both the highlights and shadows. You can see the modulation of the light inside the fixtures due to the use of tungsten lightbulbs rather than fluorescents. You can see the shadows cast by the light fixtures and even see rich colors and detail in the shadow below the floating cabinet.

Aesthetically the space is represented with a level of fidelity to the designers vision never before possible. The presentation shares a genuine appreciation of the design rather than a compromised reinterpretation that conforms to the mechanical limitations of the camera and cascading challenges involved in the use of supplemental lighting in such a restricted space.
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AuthorDean Birinyi